Archive for the ‘ERM’ category

You have to show up

June 20, 2016

Woody Allen’s adage that 80% of success is showing up is particularly difficult for some managers to take to heart regarding risk management.

When risk management is successful, there is no bell that rings.  There are no fireworks.  Usually, a successful risk management moment is evidenced by a lack of big surprises.

But most days, big surprises do not happen anyway.

So if risk managers want to be appreciated for their work, they have to do much more than just show up.  They need to build up the story around what a very good day looks like.

  • One such story would be that a very good day might happen when the world experiences a major catastrophe.  A catastrophe that is in the wheel house of the firm.  And because of a good risk management process, the firm finds that its losses are manageable within its capacity to handle losses.
  • In 2011, there were major earthquakes in New Zealand, Japan and Chile.  One reinsurer reported that they had exposures in all three zones but that they were still able to show a (very small) profit for the year.  They credited that result to a risk management process that had them limiting their exposure to any one zone.  A risk manager could work up a story of events like that happening (multi event stress scenarios) and preview the benefits of ERM.

With such stories in mind, when that big day comes when “Nothing Happens”, the risk managers can be ready to take credit!

But to do that, they need to be sure to show up.

 

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Top 10 RISKVIEWS Posts of 2014 – ORSA Heavily Featured

December 29, 2014

RISKVIEWS believes that this may be the best top 10 list of posts in the history of this blog.  Thanks to our readers whose clicks resulted in their selection.

  • Instructions for a 17 Step ORSA Process – Own Risk and Solvency Assessment is here for Canadian insurers, coming in 2015 for US and required in Europe for 2016. At least 10 other countries have also adopted ORSA and are moving towards full implementation. This post leads you to 17 other posts that give a detailed view of the various parts to a full ORSA process and report.
  • Full Limits Stress Test – Where Solvency and ERM Meet – This post suggests a link between your ERM program and your stress tests for ORSA that is highly logical, but not generally practiced.
  • What kind of Stress Test? – Risk managers need to do a better job communicating what they are doing. Much communications about risk models and stress tests is fairly mechanical and technical. This post suggests some plain English terminology to describe the stress tests to non-technical audiences such as boards and top management.
  • How to Build and Use a Risk Register – A first RISKVIEWS post from a new regular contributor, Harry Hall. Watch for more posts along these lines from Harry in the coming months. And catch Harry on his blog, http://www.pmsouth.com
  • ORSA ==> AC – ST > RCS – You will notice a recurring theme in 2014 – ORSA. That topic has taken up much of RISKVIEWS time in 2014 and will likely take up even more in 2015 and after as more and more companies undertake their first ORSA process and report. This post is a simple explanation of the question that ORSA is trying to answer that RISKVIEWS has used when explaining ORSA to a board of directors.
  • The History of Risk Management – Someone asked RISKVIEWS to do a speech on the history of ERM. This post and the associated new permanent page are the notes from writing that speech. Much more here than could fit into a 15 minute talk.
  • Hierarchy Principle of Risk Management – There are thousands of risks faced by an insurer that do not belong in their ERM program. That is because of the Hierarchy Principle. Many insurers who have followed someone’s urging that ALL risk need to be included in ERM belatedly find out that no one in top management wants to hear from them or to let them talk to the board. A good dose of the Hierarchy Principle will fix that, though it will take time. Bad first impressions are difficult to fix.
  • Risk Culture, Neoclassical Economics, and Enterprise Risk Management – A discussion of the different beliefs about how business and risk work. A difference in the beliefs that are taught in MBA and Finance programs from the beliefs about risk that underpin ERM make it difficult to reconcile spending time and money on risk management.
  • What CEO’s Think about Risk – A discussion of three different aspects of decision-making as practiced by top management of companies and the decision making processes that are taught to quants can make quants less effective when trying to explain their work and conclusions.
  • Decision Making Under Deep Uncertainty – Explores the concepts of Deep Uncertainty and Wicked Problems. Of interest if you have any risks that you find yourself unable to clearly understand or if you have any problems where all of the apparent solutions are strongly opposed by one group of stakeholders or another.

Transparency, Discipline and Allignment

October 27, 2014

Firms that have existed for any length of time are likely to have risk management.  Some of it was there from the start and the rest evolved in response to experiences.  Much of it is very efficient and effective while some of the risk management is lacking in either efficiency of effectiveness.  But some of the risk management that they might need is either missing or totally ineffective.  It is somewhat hard to know, because risk management is rarely a major subject of discussion at the firm.  Risk management happens in the background.  It may be done without thinking.  It may be done by people who do not know why they are doing it.  Some risks of the firm are very tightly controlled while others are not.  But the different treatment is not usually a conscious decision.  The importance of risk management differs greatly in the minds of different people in the firm and sometimes the actions taken to reduce risk actually work against the desired strategy of the firm.  The proponents of carefully managed risk may be thought of as the business prevention department and they are commonly found to be at war with the business expansion department.


 

Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) is an approach to risk management that provides three key advantages over traditional, ad hoc, evolved risk management.  Those advantages are:

Transparency

Discipline

Alignment

ERM takes risk management out of the background and makes it an open and transparent primary activity of the firm.  ERM does not push any particular approach to risk, but it does promote openly discussing and deciding and documenting and communicating the approach to each major risk.  The risk appetite and tolerances are decided and spoken out loud and in advance in an ERM process, rather than in arrears (and after a major loss) as is more often the case with a traditional risk management program.

Transparency is like the math teacher you had in high school who insisted that you show your work.  Even if you were one of those super bright math geeks who could just do it all in your head and immediately write down the correct answer.  When you wrote down all of the steps, it was transparent to the math teacher that you really did know what you were doing.  Transparency means the same sort of thing with ERM.  It means showing your work.  If you do not like having to slow down and show your work, you will not like ERM.

ERM is based upon setting up formal risk control cycles.  A control cycle is a discipline for assuring that the risk controlling process takes place.  A discipline, in this context, is a repeatable process that if you consistently follow the process you can expect that the outcomes from that process will be more reliable and consistent.

A pick-up sports team may or may not have talent, but it is guaranteed not to have discipline.  A school team may have a little talent or a lot and some school teams have some discipline as well.  A professional sports team usually has plenty of talent.  Often professional teams also have some discipline.  The championship sports teams usually have a little more talent than most teams (it is extremely difficult in most sports to have lots more talent than average), but they usually have much more discipline than the teams in the lower half of the league.  Discipline allows the team to consistently get the best out of their most talented players.  Discipline in ERM means that the firm is more likely to be able to expect to have the risks that they want to have.

ERM is focused on Enterprise Risks.  In RISKVIEWS mind, Enterprise Risks are those risks that could result in losses that would require the firm to make major, unexpected changes to plans or that would disrupt the firm (without necessarily causing losses) in such a way that the firm cannot successfully execute the plans.  Enterprise Risks need to be a major consideration in setting plans.  Through discussions of Risk Appetite and Tolerance and returns for risks and the costs of risk mitigations, ERM provides a focus on alignment of the risk management with the strategic objectives of the firm.

To use another sports analogy, picture the football huddle where the quarterback says “ok.  Everyone run their favorite play!”  Without ERM, that is what is happening, at least regarding ERM at some companies.

Alignment feeds off of the Transparency of ERM and Discipline provides the payback for the Alignment.

Hierarchy Principle of Risk Management

September 8, 2014

The purpose of ERM is NOT to try to elevate all risk decisions to the highest possible level, but to master discerning the best level for making each risk decision and for getting the right information to the right person in time to make a good risk decision.

This is the Hierarchy Principle as it applies to ERM.  It is one of the two or three most important principles of ERM.  Why then, might you ask, haven’t we ever heard about it before, even from RISKVIEWS.

But most insurers follow the hierarchy principle for managing their Underwriting process for risk acceptance of their most important risks.  

You could argue that many of the most spectacular losses made by banks have been in situations where they did not follow the hierarchy principle.  

  • Nick Leeson at Barings Bank was taking risks at a size that should have been decided (and rejected) by the board.
  • Jerome Kerviel at Soc Gen was doing the same.
  • The London Whale at JP Morgan is also said to have done that.  

On the other hand, Jon Corzine was taking outsized risks that eventually sank MF Global with the full knowledge and approval of the board.  Many people suggest that the CRO should have stopped that.  But RISKVIEWS believes that the Hierarchy Principle was satisfied.  

ERM is not and cannot be held responsible for bad decisions that are made at the very top of the firm, unless the risk function was providing flawed information that supported those decisions.  If, as happened at MF Global, the board and top management were making risk decisions with their eyes fully open and informed by the risk function, then ERM worked as it should.  

ERM does not prevent mistakes or bad judgment.

What ERM does that is new is that

  1. it works to systematically determine the significance of all risk decisions, 
  2. it ranks the significance and uses that information, along with other information such as risk velocity and uncertainty, to determine a recommendation of the best level to make decisions about each risk,
  3. it assesses the ability of the firm to absorb losses and the potential for losses within the risks that are being held by the firm at any point in time,
  4. it works with management and the board to craft a risk appetite statement that links the loss absorbing capacity of the firm with the preferences of management and the board for absorbing losses.

ERM does not manage the firm.  ERM helps management to manage the risks of the firm mainly by providing information about the risks.  

So why have we not heard about this Hierarchy Principle before?  

For many years, ERM have been fighting to get any traction, to have a voice.  The Hierarchy Principle complicates the message, so was left out by many early CROs and other pioneers.  A few were pushing for the risk function to be itself elevated as high as possible and they did not want to limit the risk message, deeming everything about risk to be of highest importance. But RISKVIEWS believes that it was mostly because the Hierarchy Principle is pretty fundamental to business management and is usually not explicitly stated anywhere else, even though it is applied almost always.

ERM now receives a major push from regulators, to a large extent from the ORSA.  In writing, the regulators do not require that ERM elevate all risk decisions.  But in practice, they are seeing some insurers who have been elevating everything and the regulators are adopting those examples as their standard for best in class.  

Just one more way that the regulatory support for ERM will speed its demise.  If regulators advocate for consistent violation of the Hierarchy principle, then ERM will be seen mainly as a wasteful burden.  

 

Has the risk profession become a spectator sport?

April 3, 2013

The 2013 ERM Symposium goes back to Chicago this year after a side trip to DC for 2012. This is the 11th year for the premier program for financial risk managers.   April 23 and 24th.

This year’s program has been developed around the theme, ERM: A Critical Self-Reflection, which asks:

  • Has the risk profession become a spectator sport? One in which we believe we are being proactive, yet not necessarily in the right areas.
  • For the most significant headlines during the past year, how was the risk management function involved?
  • Since the financial crisis, has there been genuine learning and changes to how risk management functions operate?
  • What are the lessons that have been learned and how are they shaping risk management today? If not, why?
  • Does risk management have a seat at the table, at the correct table?
  • Are risk managers as empowered as they should be?
  • Is risk management asking the right questions?
  • Is risk management as involved in decision making and value creation as it should be, at inception of ideas and during follow through?

On Wednesday, April 24 Former FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair will be the featured luncheon speaker

Sheila C. Bair served as the 19th chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation for a five-year term, from June 2006 through July 2011. Bair has an extensive background in banking and finance in a career that has taken her from Capitol Hill to academia to the highest levels of government. Before joining the FDIC in 2006, she was the dean’s professor of financial regulatory policy for the Isenberg School of Management at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst since 2002.

The ERM Symposium and seminars bring together ERM knowledge from the insurance, energy and financial sectors.  Now in its 11th year, this premier global conference on ERM will offer: sessions featuring top risk management experts; seminars on hot ERM issues; ERM research from leading universities; exhibitors demonstrating their ERM services.  This program has been developed jointly by the Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS), the Professional Risk management International Association (PRMIA) and the Society of Actuaries (SOA).

Riskviews will be a speaker at three sessions out of more than 20 offered:

  • Regulatory Reform: Responding to Complexity with Complexity – Andrew Haldane, executive director of Financial Stability at the Bank of England, recently made a speech at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City’s Jackson Hole Economic Policy Symposium titled “The Dog and the Frisbee” warning that the growing complexity of markets and banks cannot be controlled with increasingly complex regulations. In fact, by attempting to solve the problem of complexity with additional complexity created by increased regulation, we may be missing the mark—perhaps simpler metrics and human judgment may be superior. Furthermore, in attempting to solve a complex problem with additional complexity, we may not have clearly defined or understand the problem. How does ERM fit into the solutions arsenal? Are there avenues left unexplored? Is ERM adding or minimizing complexity?
    • We are drowning in data, but can’t hope to track all the necessary variables, nor understand all or even the most important linkages. Given the wealth of data available, important signals may be lost in the overall “noise.”
    • Unintended consequences maybe lost/hidden in the maze of complexity thereby magnifying the potential impact of future events.
    • The importance of key variables changes throughout time and from situation to situation, so it’s not possible to predict in advance which ones will matter most in the next crisis.
    • We experience relatively few new crises that are mirror images of prior crises, so we really have limited history to learn how to prevent or to cure them.
    • Complex rules incent companies and individuals to “manage to the rules” and seek arbitrage, perhaps seeding the next crisis.
  • Actuarial Professional Risk Management  –  The new actuarial standards for Risk Evaluation and Risk Treatment bring new help and new issues to actuaries practicing in the ERM field. For new entrants, the standards are good guidelines for preparing comprehensive analyses and reports to management. For more experienced practitioners, the standards lay out expectations for a product worthy of the highly-qualified actuary. However, meeting the standards’ expectations is not easy. This session focuses on clarifying key aspects of the standards.
  • Enterprise Risk Management in Financial Intermediation  –  This session provides a framework for thinking about the rapidly evolving, some would say amorphous, subject of ERM, especially as applied at financial institutions and develops seven principles of ERM and considers their (mis)application in a variety of organizational settings. The takeaways are both foundational and practical.

Please join us for some ERM fun and excitement.

 

 

One Page ERM

May 30, 2012

The International Association of Insurance Supervisors adopted the following in late 2011 as a part of ICP 8.

ERM Mission Statements

January 10, 2012

From the Annual Reports:

A.     Risk management is a key part of our corporate management. Its task is not only to safeguard the Group’s financial strength in order to satisfy our obligations to clients and create sustained value for our shareholders, but also to protect Munich Re’s reputation. We achieve these objectives through global risk management encompassing all areas of our operations. (Munich Re)

B.     The financial crisis has demonstrated the importance of a strong and independent risk management function, as well as the need for an  integrated approach to  assessing and controlling  risks. To this end, we further enhanced our risk management by establishing a more robust governance process, intensifying our risk oversight and strengthening our  liquidity management. (Swiss Re)

C.     We employ an enterprise-wide approach to all risk taking and risk management activities globally. The enterprise risk management framework sets out policies and standards of practice related to risk governance, risk identification and monitoring, risk measurement, and risk control and mitigation. In order to ensure that we can effectively execute our risk management we continuously invest to attract and retain qualified risk professionals, and to build and maintain the necessary processes, tools and systems. (Manulife Financial)

D.    Management believes that effective risk management is of primary importance to the success of Goldman Sachs. Accordingly, we have a comprehensive risk management process to monitor, evaluate and manage the principal risks we assume in conducting our activities.

E.     AEGON’s risk management and control systems are designed to ensure that these risks are managed as effectively and efficiently as possible. For AEGON, risk management involves:
·      Understanding which risks the company is able to underwrite;
·      Assessing the risk-return trade-off associated with these risks;
·      Establishing limits for the level of exposure to a particular risk or combination of risks; and Measuring and monitoring risk exposures and actively managing the company’s overall risk and solvency positions.

F.     The mission of Zurich’s Enterprise Risk Management is to promptly identify, measure, manage, report and monitor risks that affect the achievement of our strategic, operational and financial objectives. This includes adjusting the risk profile in line with the Group’s stated risk tolerance to respond to new threats and opportunities in order to optimize returns.

G.     QBE’s risk management strategy is underpinned by a number of robust processes which are aimed at reducing uncertainty and volatility and avoiding unwelcome surprises. Risks are subject to rigorous identification and evaluation throughout the business management cycle.

H.    The management of risk is a core skill supporting the Group’s ability to offer both sustainable risk transfer solutions to its clients and attractive returns to shareholders. The management and identification of risk is the day to day responsibility of many of our staff and is a feature of all our business activities. (Amlin)

I.      Diversification is used as a tool to reduce the Group’s overall insurance risk profile by spreading exposures, thereby reducing the volatility of results. QBE’s approach is to diversify insurance risk, both by product and geographically.

J.      The Group employs a comprehensive risk management framework to identify, assess, manage and monitor the risks arising as a result of operating the business. The framework includes a comprehensive suite of risk policies, procedures, measurement, reporting and monitoring techniques and a series of stress tests and scenario analyses to ensure that the Group’s risk exposures are managed appropriately. (RSA)


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