Posted tagged ‘Business’

Risk Intelligence IV

March 20, 2019

Overcoming Biases

In a recent post, RISKVIEWS proposed that Risk Intelligence would overcome biases.  Here are some specifics…

Biases

  • Anchoring – too much reliance on first experience
  • Availability – overestimate likelihood of events that readily come to mind
  • Confirmation Bias – look for information that confirms bias
  • Endowment effect – overvalue what you already have
  • Framing effect – conclusion depends on how the question is phrased
  • Gambler’s Fallacy – Belief that future probabilities are impacted by past experience – reversion to mean
  • Hindsight bias – things seem to be predictable after they happen
  • Illusion of control – overestimate degree of control over events
  • Overconfidence – believe own answers are more correct
  • Status Quo bias – Expect things to stay the same
  • Survivorship bias – only look at the people who finished a process, not all who started
  • Ostrich Effect – Ignore negative information

Each of Education, Experience and Analysis should reduce all of these.

Experience should provide the feedback that most of these ideas are simply wrong.  The original work that started to identify these biases followed the standard psychology approach of excluding anyone with experience and would also prohibit anyone from trying any of the questions a second time.  So learning to identify and avoid these biases through experience has had limited testing.

Education for a risk manager should simply mention all of these biases directly and their adverse consequences.  Many risk managers receiving that education will ever after seek to avoid making those mistakes.

But some will be blinded by the perceptual biases and therefore resist abandoning their gut feel that actually follows the biases.

Analysis may provide the information to convince  some of these remaining holdouts.  Analysis, if done correctly, will follow the logic of economic rationality which is the metric that we used to identify the wrong decisions that were eventually aggregated as biases.

So there may still be some people who even in the face of:

  • Experience of less than optimal outcomes
  • Education that provides discussion and examples of the adverse impact of decision-making based upon the biases.
  • Analysis that provides numerical back-up for unbiased decision making

Will still want to trust their own gut to make decisions regarding risk.

You can probably weed out those folks in hiring.

2019 Most Dangerous Risks

March 1, 2019

top5

For 2019, a new poll on 180 insurance executives ranks four out of five of last year’s top risks again in the top 5.

See more details at https://blog.willis.com/2019/02/2019-most-dangerous-risks-to-insurers/ 

 

Risk Intelligence II

February 28, 2019

Somehow it worked.

Several psychologists stated that economists were rational and those who didn’t know what economists knew were irrational.

They collected data on how irrational folks are and analyzed that data and grouped it and gave cute names to various groups.

But I think that you could do the same thing with long division. Certainly with calculus. Compare answers of rubes on the sidewalk to math PhD s on a bunch of math questions and how well do you think the rubes would do?

Some of the questions that the psychologists asked were about risk. They proved that folks who rely solely on their gut to make decisions about risk were not very good at it.

I am sure that no-one with any Risk Intelligence would have bet against that finding.

Because Risk Intelligence consists of more than just trusting your gut. It also requires education regarding the best practices for risk management and risk assessment along with stories of how well (and sometimes ill) intentioned business managers went wrong with risk. It also requires careful analysis. Often statistical analysis. Analysis that is usually not particularly intuitive even with experience.

But Risk Intelligence still needs a well developed gut. Because history doesn’t repeat, analysis always requires simplification and assumptions to fill out a model where data is insufficient.

Only with all of Education, Experience and Analysis is Risk Intelligence achievable and even then it is not guaranteed.

And in addition, Education, Experience and Analysis are the cure for the irrational biases found by the psychologists. I would bet that the psychologists systematically excluded any responses from a person with Risk Intelligence. That would have invalidated their investigation.

Their conclusion could have been that many of us need basic financial and risk education, better understanding of how to accumulate helpful experiences and some basic analytical skills. Not as much fun as a long list of cutely names biases, but much more helpful.

Did the Three Pigs have different Risk Tolerances?

March 21, 2018

Or did they just have a different view of the degree of risk in their environment?

3 PigsBy Alex Proimos from Sydney, Australia – Three Little Pigs

Think about it?  Is there any evidence that the first pig, whose house was made off straw, was fine with the idea of losing his house?  Not really.  More likely, he thought that the world was totally benign.  He thought that there was no way that his straw house wouldn’t be there tomorrow and the next day.  He was not tolerant of the risk of losing his house.  He just didn’t think it would happen.  But he was wrong.  It could and did happen.

The second pig used sticks instead of straw.  Did that mean that the second pig had less tolerance for risk than the first pig?  Probably not.  The second pig probably thought that a house of sticks was sturdy enough to withstand whatever the world would send against it.  This pig thought that the world was more dangerous than the first pig.  He needed sticks, rather than straw to make the house sturdy enough to last.  He also was wrong.  Sticks were not enough either.

That third pig has a house of bricks.  That probably cost much more than sticks or straw and took longer to build as well.  The third pig thought that the world was pretty dangerous for houses.  And he was right.  Bricks were sturdy enough to survive.  At least on the day that the wolf came by.

The problem here was not risk tolerance, but inappropriate parameters for the risk models of the first two pigs.  When they parameterized their models, the first pig probably put down zero for the number of wolves in the area.  After all, the first pig had never ever seen a wolf.  The second pig, may have put down 1 wolf, but when he went to enter the parameter for how hard could the wolf blow, he put down “not very hard”.  He had not seen a wolf either.  But he had heard of wolves.  He didn’t know about the wind speed of a full on wolf huff and puff.  His model told him that sticks could withstand whatever a wolf could do to his house.  When the third pig built his risk model, he answered that there were “many” wolves around.  And when he filled in the parameter for how hard the wolf could blow, he put “very”.  When he was a wee tiny pig, he had seen a wolf blow down a house built of sticks that had a straw roof.  He was afraid of wolves for a reason.

 

 

Keys to ERM – Adaptability

April 3, 2017

keys

Deliberately cultivating adaptability is how ERM reduces exposure to unexpected surprises.

There are four ways that an ERM program encourages adaptability:

  1. Risk Identification
  2. Emerging Risks
  3. Reaction step of Control Cycle
  4. Risk Learning

Many risk managers tell RISKVIEWS that their bosses say that their objective is “No Surprises”.  While that is an unrealistic ideal objective, cultivating Adaptability is the most likely way to approach that ideal.

More on Adaptability at WILLIS TOWERS WATSON WIRE.

Updating your Risk Register

January 26, 2017

It is quite easy for an ERM program to become irrelevant.  All it takes is for it to stay the same for several years.  After just a few years, you will find that you risk management processes are focused upon the issues of several years ago.  You may be missing new wrinkles to your risks and also repeating mitigation exercises that are no longer effective or needed.

That is because the risk environment is constantly changing.  Some risks are become more dangerous while for others the danger is receding.  No firm anywhere has an unlimited budget for risk management.  So to remain effective, you need to constantly reshuffle priorities.

One place where that reshuffling is very much needed is in the risk register.  That is a hard message to sell.  Risk Identification is seen by most as the first baby step in initiating and ERM program.  How could a well developed, sophisticated ERM program need to go back to the first baby step.

But we do need to go back and somehow get people to seriously re-evaluate the Risks on the Risk Register.  That is because risk management is fundamentally a cycle rather than a a one way development process.  We are all brainwashed that constant growth and steady improvement is the fundamental nature of human enterprise.  For risk management to really work, we need that cycle model where we go back and do all of the same steps as last year all over again.

One way to freshen up the process of reviewing the risk register is to bring in outside information.  The link below provides some good outside information that you can use to stimulate your own review.

Willis Re took the top 15 risks from a dozen insurer risk registers and combined them to get 50+ unique risks.  Then over 100 insurer executives and risk management staff helped to rank those 50 risks.


2017’s most dangerous risks for insurers

We took a list of over 50 risks commonly found on insurer risk registers, and asked, “Which risks present the most danger to your firm in 2017?”


Take a look.  How does the resulting ranking look compared to your risk register?  Do any of the top 10 risks show up as middling priority in your program?  Are any of the bottom ten risks near the top of your priority ranking?  So your review can focus on a discussion of the most significant deviations between your ranking and the ranking from the link above. You need to convince yourself that you have good reasons for different priorities or change your priorities.

Risk Trajectory – Do you know which way your risk is headed?

July 25, 2016

Arrows

Which direction are you planning on taking?

  • Are you expecting your risk to grow faster than your capacity to bare risk?
  • Are you expecting your risk capacity to grow faster than your risk?
  • Or are you planning to keep growth of your risk and your capacity in balance?

If risk is your business, then the answer to this question is one of just a few statements that make up a basic risk strategy.

RISKVIEWS calls this the Risk Trajectory.  Risk Trajectory is not a permanent aspect of a businesses risk strategy.  Trajectory will change unpredictably and usually not each year.

There are four factors that have the most influence on Risk Trajectory:

  1. Your Risk Profile – often stated in terms of the potential losses from all risks at a particular likelihood (i.e. 1 in 200 years)
  2. Your capacity to bare risk – often stated in terms of capital
  3. Your preferred level of security (may be factored directly into the return period used for Risk Profile or stated as a buffer above Risk Profile)
  4. The likely rewards for accepting the risks in your Risk Profile

If you have a comfortable margin between your Risk Profile and your preferred level of security, then you might accept a risk trajectory of Risk Growing Faster than Capacity.

Or if the Likely Rewards seem very good, you might be willing to accept a little less security for the higher reward.

All four of the factors that influence Risk Trajectory are constantly moving.  Over time, anything other than carefully coordinated movements will result in occasional need to change trajectory.  In some cases, the need to change trajectory comes from an unexpected large loss that results in an abrupt change in your capacity.

For the balanced risk and capacity trajectory, you would need to maintain a level of profit as a percentage of the Risk Profile that is on the average over time equal to the growth in Risk Profile.

For Capacity to grow faster than Risk, the profit as a percentage of the Risk Profile would be greater than the growth in Risk Profile.

For Risk to grow faster than Capacity, Risk profile growth rate would be greater than the profit as a percentage of the Risk Profile.

RISKVIEWS would guess that all this is just as easy to do as juggling four balls that are a different and somewhat unpredictably different size, shape and weight when they come down compared to when you tossed them up.

 


%d bloggers like this: