Communicating with CEOs

 The point of communication isn’t to speak. It’s to be heard and understood — to have influence and motivate action. Effective communication requires knowing what information you want to convey and what action you want to motivate, but that’s not enough. You must also know your audience — in this case CEOs—well enough to determine what factors will truly resonate and motivate them to take the desired action based on your information.

CEO’s often are not thinking about their key decisions in the same statistical terms that a risk manager or other quantitative analyst would favor.   Several different studies show that most experienced decision makers do not apply statistical thinking either.  Instead they apply a natural decision making process assisted liberally by heuristics. 

CEO’s and other leaders also commonly have different perspectives on priorities than risk managers and analysts.  Analysts will tend to see the world “realistically” with a balance between risks and rewards, while CEO’s may have reached their position, in part, because they see the world “optimisticslly” as containing plenty of opportunities where rewards are much more likely than overstated risks.  Of course, from the perspective of the CEO, the analysts are “pessimistic” and they themselves are “realistic”. 

To communicate with CEO’s, risk managers and analysts need to learn to frame the results of their work in terms that make sense to CEO’s.  That will often be in terms of Natural Decision Making, Heuristics and Opportunities. 

For more on this topic, see Actuarial Review “How to Talk to a CEO“. 

 

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