Risk Capacity Measurement

By  Jean-Pierre Berliet

In insurance companies, where “production” consists of risk assumption and risk accumulation, measuring a company’s risk capacity and risk capacity utilization is not as straightforward as in companies that manufacture widgets. Like industrial companies, insurance companies need to measure and manage their “production” or rather “risk” (accumulation) capacity.

 

The recent crisis has demonstrated that insurance companies need to measure and manage their risk capacity utilization in relation to the amount of risk capacity lest they become overextended. In insurance companies, risk capacity needs to be determined so as to satisfy:

  • Solvency concerns of policyholders, for which insurance strength ratings assigned by the leading independent rating agencies and A.M. Best are generally accepted as proxies. Shareholders are also interested in these ratings, which they view as indicators of companies’ ability to attract and retain customers and achieve their financial objectives.
  • Maintenance of regulatory Risk Based Capital (RBC) adequacy ratios sufficient to prevent regulators from intervening in company management.

 

Risk capacity is most commonly a measure of an insurance company’s ability to accumulate risk exposures, on a going concern basis, while meeting risk tolerance constraints of solvency-focused stakeholders (policyholders, rating agencies and regulators). Risk concerns of these stakeholders are generally expressed as confidence levels at which a company is capable of meeting particular standards of performance, (e.g. maximum probability of default, maintenance of the capital needed to support a target rating or RBC adequacy level) over a defined time horizon.

 

A company’s risk capacity is customarily measured by its available capital and its risk capacity utilization is measured by the amount of capital needed to meet the risk tolerance constraints of credit-sensitive stakeholders, given its present portfolio of risk exposures. In order to gain the confidence of investors and customers and to enjoy a viable future, an insurance company needs to understand how its strategic plan impacts the prospective utilization of its risk capacity, and therefore the adequacy of its capital in relation to its projected financial performance and growth aspirations.

 

To perform this assessment, a company needs to estimate its prospective risk capacity utilization (i.e. capital required) for executing its strategic plan. To perform this analysis, it needs to project its risk profile over a three to five years planning horizon (approximating going concern conditions), under growth assumptions embedded in its strategic plan. A properly constructed risk profile should enable a company to consider the impact of extreme conditions, often scenarios that include multiple catastrophes or financial crises, as well as the contribution of earnings retention to risk capacity. This basic strategic planning exercise, completed in a risk-aware framework will demonstrate the risk capital (and, thus, capacity utilization) required to execute the strategic plan.

Ideally, the required financial models should be capable of producing i) full distributions of financial outcomes rather than tail sections of these distributions, ii) elements of the balance sheet and P&L statements needed to calculate earnings, earnings volatility, downside risk from planned earning amounts in future periods, iii) calculations of RBC, and associated capital adequacy ratios, including A.M. Best’s capital adequacy ratio (BCAR) and iv) financial performance reports developed under multiple accounting standards, including statutory and GAAP or IFRS, or on an economic basis. These data are needed for management to explore how capital requirements and thus also risk capacity utilization respond to changes in risk strategy and business strategy.

 

The company’s risk profile can be derived from the aggregation of the distributions of financial results of individual lines or business segments based on the amount and volatility characteristics of exposures, limits assumed, applicable reinsurance treaties, and asset mix, over a three to five year time horizon so as to approximate going concern conditions.

 

The use of multi-year solvency analyses of companies’ risk profile, instead of a one year horizon required under the regulatory provisions of many jurisdictions, typically results in significantly higher estimates of risk capital requirements and risk capacity utilization than those obtained under the one year horizon. As a result, companies that rely primarily on one year solvency analyses to assess the adequacy of their capital tend to understate their capital requirements and are more likely to overextend themselves. Importantly, the underlying assumption that capital shortfalls could be covered as and when needed by raising capital from investors has been shown to be unrealistic during the recent financial crisis, highlighting what may be a fundamental flaw in the widely touted Solvency II framework.

 

 

 

 

 

Jean-Pierre Berliet

(203) 247-6448

jpberliet@att.net

 

February 14, 2011

 

 

Note: This article is abstracted from the “Risk Management and Business Strategy in P/C Insurance Companies” briefing paper published by Advisen (www.advisen.com) and available at the Corner Store.

 

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