Eggs and Baskets

Andrew Carnegie once famously said

“put all your eggs in one basket. and then watch that basket”

It seems impossible on first thought to think of that as a view consistent with risk management.  But Carnegie was phenomenally successful.  Is it possible that he did that flaunting risk management?

Garry Kasparov – World Chess Champ (22 years) put it this way…

“You have to rely on your intuition.  My intuition was wrong very few times.”

George Soros has said that he actually gets an ache in his back when the market is about to turn, indicating that he needs to abruptly change his strategy.

Soros, Kasparov, Carnegie are not your run of the mill punters.  They each had successful runs for many years.

My theory of their success is that the intuition of Kasparov actually does take into account much more than the long hard careful consideration of a middling chess master.  Carnegie and Soros also knew much more about their markets than any other person alive in their time.

While they may not have consciously been following the rules, they were actually incorporating all of the drivers of those rules into their decisions.  Most of those rules are actually “heuristics” or shortcuts that work as long as things are what they have been but are not of much use when things are changing.  In fact, those rules may be what is getting one into trouble during shifts in the world.

Risk models embody an implicit set of rules about how the market work.  Those models fail when the market fails to conform to the rules embedded in the model.  That is when things change, when your thinking needs to transcend the heuristics.

So where does that leave the risk manager?

The insights of the ultra successful types that are cited above can be seen to refute the risk management approach, OR they can be seen as a goal for risk managers.

The basket that Carnegie was putting all of his eggs into was steel.  His insight about steel was correct, but his statement about eggs and baskets is not particularly applicable to situations less transformational than steel.  It is the logic that many applied during the dot com boom, much to their regret in 2001/2002.

The risk manager should look at statements and positions like those above as levels of understanding to strive for.  If the risk managers work starts and remains a gigantic mass of data and risk positions without ever reaching any insights about the underlying nature of the risks that are at play, then something is missing.

Perhaps the business that the risk manager works for is one that by choice and risk tolerance insists on plodding about the middle of the pack in risk.

But the way that the risk manager can add the most value is when they are able to provide the insights about the baskets that can handle more eggs.  And can start to have intuitions about risks that are reliable and perhaps are accompanied by unmistakable physical side effects.

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Explore posts in the same categories: Action, Diversification, Modeling, Profits, Risk, Risk Learning

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