Your Mother Should Know

Something as massive as the current financial crisis is much too large to have one or two or even three simple drivers.  There were many, many mistakes made by many different people.

My mother, who was never employed in the financial world,  would have cautioned against many of those mistakes.

When I was 16, I had some fine arguments with my mother about the girls that I was dating. My mother did not want me dating any girls that she did not want me to marry.

That was absolutely silly, I argued. I was years and years away from getting married. That was a concern for another time. My mother knew that in those days, “shotgun marriages” were common, a sudden unexpected change that triggered a long-term commitment. Well, as it happened, even without getting a shotgun involved, five years later I got married to a girl that I started dating when I was 16.

There are two different approaches to risk that firms in the risk-taking business use. One approach is to assume that they can and will always be able to trade away risks at will. The other approach is to assume that any risks will be held by the firm to maturity. If the risk managers of the firms with the risk-trading approach would have listened to their mothers, they would have treated those traded risks as if they might one day hold those risks until maturity. In most cases, the risk traders can easily offload their risks at
will. Using that approach, they can exploit little bits of risk insight to trade ahead of market drops. But when the news reveals a sudden unexpected adverse turn, the trading away option often disappears. In fact, using the trading option will often result in locking in more severe losses than what might eventually occur. And in the most extreme situations, trading just freezes up and there is not even the option to get out with an excessive loss.

So the conclusion here is that, at some level, every entity that handles risks should be assessing what would happen if they ended up owning the risk that they thought they would only have temporarily. This would have a number of consequences. First of all, it could well stop the idea of high speed trading of very, very complex risks. If these risks are too complex to evaluate fully during the intended holding period, then perhaps it would be better for all if the trading just did not happen so very quickly. In the case of the recent subprime-related issues, banks often had very different risk analysis requirements for trading books of risks vs. their banking book of risks. The banking (credit mostly) risks required intense due diligence or underwriting.  The trading book only had to be run through models, where the assignment of assumptions was not required to be based upon internal analysis.

From 2008 . . .

Risk Management: The Current Financial Crisis, Lessons Learned and Future Implications

Lots more great stuff there.  Check it out.

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Explore posts in the same categories: Assumptions, Execution Risk, Financial Crisis, Trading

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